Travel

Our travel data provides a window into how cities move.

Our data shows how many trips are made by cars and larger vehicles on our roads, and when travel-time savings on our roads are at their highest.

You can use our shared data to optimise your own travel and to learn more about how people choose to move around cities.

Travel

Our travel data provides a window into how cities move.

Our data shows how many trips are made by cars and larger vehicles on our roads, and when travel-time savings on our roads are at their highest.

You can use our shared data to optimise your own travel and to learn more about how people choose to move around cities.

Explore our travel data

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Toll road travel
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Travel patterns and preferences
Toll road icon

Toll road travel

On average our customers make over two million trips on our roads every day – and save around 413,000 in travel-time every workday by taking our roads instead of the alternate routes.
Data here shows average daily traffic numbers on each of our roads and provides a snapshot of travel-time savings on our roads.

The following graphs show average daily traffic levels across the cities we operate in since June 2020.

Average Daily Traffic (light vehicles)
Average Daily Traffic (large vehicles)

In the August 2023 edition of our Urban Mobility Trends report, we asked people in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, the Greater Washington Area and Montreal how regularly they use toll roads. We found most people use toll roads occasionally, and in most cases, less than once a week.

Find out about the cost of tolls

On average Linkt customers travelling in a private vehicle spend $6.70 per week on tolls, with 82% spending less than $10 per week. Linkt is Transurban's retail brand in Australia. You can calculate the cost of a tolled trip using one of our Toll Calculators, see links below:

Linkt Assist

If you or someone you know is facing hardship and having difficulty managing toll payments, please get in contact with Linkt Assist, our dedicated hardship response team.

Tolls on our roads are higher for large vehicles than for cars and motorcycles.
For example, in Sydney, depending on the road, large vehicle travel costs between two and three times what it costs to travel in a standard car.
The time savings large vehicles gain by using our roads is factored into these higher costs—as is the additional cost of wear-and-tear heavy vehicles cause. You can find out more about productivity benefits of toll roads here.

The amount of wear-and-tear a vehicle contributes is not a per-tonne calculation—wear-and-tear contributed by heavier vehicles increases exponentially.

As shown here, the cost to accommodate combination vehicles (the heaviest trucks on our roads, that weigh 40+ tons when full loaded) is more than five times higher than light vehicles. This is due to the higher amount of wear-and-tear caused by heavy vehicles and the extra costs associated with construction. Toll road design incorporates special features, such as suitable pavement depth and grades, tunnel heights, tunnel ventilation and breakdown bays, to accommodate large vehicles, which increases the overall project cost.

The following table shows when travel time saved on our Sydney roads is highest, compared to the time it would take you on the alternate route. For information about how much time, fuel and emissions toll-road travel could save you, check out our Trip Compare tool.

While toll roads are generally the quickest way to get from A to B, they can get congested in peak times, just like alternate routes.

You can use these charts to figure out how much extra time your trip would take at different times of the day on our toll roads in Sydney and Melbourne, compared to during a free run with no congestion. This data does not provide a comparison with travel by alternate routes, it only reflects congestion on each Transurban road.



Shifting travel times delivers time-savings benefits

Choosing to travel outside of peak hour could have a big impact on congestion. For example, analysis of CityLink (Tullamarine Freeway) traffic in Melbourne shows that if 6% of motorists heading towards the city shifted their travel outside the busiest hours of 6am to 9am, traffic levels would be similar to those observed during school holidays and average speeds would increase by over 10 km/h.

The following graphs show average daily traffic levels across the cities we operate in since June 2020.

Average Daily Traffic (light vehicles)
Average Daily Traffic (large vehicles)

In the August 2023 edition of our Urban Mobility Trends report, we asked people in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, the Greater Washington Area and Montreal how regularly they use toll roads. We found most people use toll roads occasionally, and in most cases, less than once a week.

Find out about the cost of tolls

On average Linkt customers travelling in a private vehicle spend $6.70 per week on tolls, with 82% spending less than $10 per week. Linkt is Transurban's retail brand in Australia. You can calculate the cost of a tolled trip using one of our Toll Calculators, see links below:

Linkt Assist

If you or someone you know is facing hardship and having difficulty managing toll payments, please get in contact with Linkt Assist, our dedicated hardship response team.

Tolls on our roads are higher for large vehicles than for cars and motorcycles.
For example, in Sydney, depending on the road, large vehicle travel costs between two and three times what it costs to travel in a standard car.
The time savings large vehicles gain by using our roads is factored into these higher costs—as is the additional cost of wear-and-tear heavy vehicles cause. You can find out more about productivity benefits of toll roads here.

The amount of wear-and-tear a vehicle contributes is not a per-tonne calculation—wear-and-tear contributed by heavier vehicles increases exponentially.

As shown here, the cost to accommodate combination vehicles (the heaviest trucks on our roads, that weigh 40+ tons when full loaded) is more than five times higher than light vehicles. This is due to the higher amount of wear-and-tear caused by heavy vehicles and the extra costs associated with construction. Toll road design incorporates special features, such as suitable pavement depth and grades, tunnel heights, tunnel ventilation and breakdown bays, to accommodate large vehicles, which increases the overall project cost.

The following table shows when travel time saved on our Sydney roads is highest, compared to the time it would take you on the alternate route. For information about how much time, fuel and emissions toll-road travel could save you, check out our Trip Compare tool.

While toll roads are generally the quickest way to get from A to B, they can get congested in peak times, just like alternate routes.

You can use these charts to figure out how much extra time your trip would take at different times of the day on our toll roads in Sydney and Melbourne, compared to during a free run with no congestion. This data does not provide a comparison with travel by alternate routes, it only reflects congestion on each Transurban road.



Shifting travel times delivers time-savings benefits

Choosing to travel outside of peak hour could have a big impact on congestion. For example, analysis of CityLink (Tullamarine Freeway) traffic in Melbourne shows that if 6% of motorists heading towards the city shifted their travel outside the busiest hours of 6am to 9am, traffic levels would be similar to those observed during school holidays and average speeds would increase by over 10 km/h.

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Travel patterns and preference

Every year we survey people on how they choose to move around their city, and what influences their choices, as part of our annual Urban Mobility Trends report. Explore the findings below or read the full reports here.

In our July 2023 survey (report published August 2023) we asked people how regularly they use each mode of transport now, and how they expect this may change over the next 12 months. We found more people are driving every day compared to our July 2022 survey.

In our July 2022 survey (report published August 2022) we asked people what mode of transport they use to make different trip types and found: 

  • public transport is the most common mode of transport for commuting
  • people are more likely to choose ride share services or carpool when heading to social events
  • local and arterial roads are relied on by people to run errands
  • the most common reason for using toll roads or Express Lanes is to go on a getaway, or when travelling to or from the airport.

For most people in Australia, a driver's licence is a necessity to get out and about. Nearly half of people surveyed in Australia said they need a drivers licence to participate in social activities and as a requirement of their job.

Most people learn to drive from their parents or guardian, but not everyone has someone available to teach them how to drive, or the means to be able to pay for lessons.

To help overcome this Transurban works with driver training schools to provide free driving lessons to those who need them most, find out more here.

In our July 2023 survey (report published August 2023) we asked people how often they travel to their workplace and whether they expect this to increase or decrease over the next 12 months, and how they get to work. We found:

  • most people expect to travel to their workplace for most of the week
  • the number of days people expect to travel to their workplace in the next 12 months is likely to stay the same, however a greater proportion expect this to increase rather than decrease
  • most people commute to work via private vehicle.

In our July 2022 survey (report published August 2022) we asked whether people's commuting patterns had changed since the start of the pandemic and found that 1 in 4 people had changed the way they get to work or study since the pandemic started, with most switching from public transport to private vehicles.

In our July 2023 survey (report published August 2023) we asked what factors people consider when choosing which mode of transport to take, and whether the cost of fuel influences their choices. We found:

  • Fuel prices are top concern, but most people do not consider the price when making transport decisions
  • Most people use toll rods to save time, take the most direct route and avoid traffic.


In our July 2023 survey (report published August 2023) we asked people how regularly they use each mode of transport now, and how they expect this may change over the next 12 months. We found more people are driving every day compared to our July 2022 survey.

In our July 2022 survey (report published August 2022) we asked people what mode of transport they use to make different trip types and found: 

  • public transport is the most common mode of transport for commuting
  • people are more likely to choose ride share services or carpool when heading to social events
  • local and arterial roads are relied on by people to run errands
  • the most common reason for using toll roads or Express Lanes is to go on a getaway, or when travelling to or from the airport.

For most people in Australia, a driver's licence is a necessity to get out and about. Nearly half of people surveyed in Australia said they need a drivers licence to participate in social activities and as a requirement of their job.

Most people learn to drive from their parents or guardian, but not everyone has someone available to teach them how to drive, or the means to be able to pay for lessons.

To help overcome this Transurban works with driver training schools to provide free driving lessons to those who need them most, find out more here.

In our July 2023 survey (report published August 2023) we asked people how often they travel to their workplace and whether they expect this to increase or decrease over the next 12 months, and how they get to work. We found:

  • most people expect to travel to their workplace for most of the week
  • the number of days people expect to travel to their workplace in the next 12 months is likely to stay the same, however a greater proportion expect this to increase rather than decrease
  • most people commute to work via private vehicle.

In our July 2022 survey (report published August 2022) we asked whether people's commuting patterns had changed since the start of the pandemic and found that 1 in 4 people had changed the way they get to work or study since the pandemic started, with most switching from public transport to private vehicles.

In our July 2023 survey (report published August 2023) we asked what factors people consider when choosing which mode of transport to take, and whether the cost of fuel influences their choices. We found:

  • Fuel prices are top concern, but most people do not consider the price when making transport decisions
  • Most people use toll rods to save time, take the most direct route and avoid traffic.