Roads of the future

The future is automated

We are living in a connected world, where our fridges remind us to buy milk, our phones tell us when to go to bed and our cars can read speed-limit signs and slow down or speed up—all on their own.

This kind of connected technology is set to dramatically change how we travel in the future. As more and more connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) appear on our roads, with varying purposes and levels of sophistication, transport operators will have more and more opportunities to use this technology to everyone’s advantage.

We don’t know when the vast majority of cars on our roads will be CAVs—this timeline is still hotly debated. But we do know CAVs are coming—and we also know we need to be ready.

Roads of the future

The future is automated

We are living in a connected world, where our fridges remind us to buy milk, our phones tell us when to go to bed and our cars can read speed-limit signs and slow down or speed up—all on their own.

This kind of connected technology is set to dramatically change how we travel in the future. As more and more connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) appear on our roads, with varying purposes and levels of sophistication, transport operators will have more and more opportunities to use this technology to everyone’s advantage.

We don’t know when the vast majority of cars on our roads will be CAVs—this timeline is still hotly debated. But we do know CAVs are coming—and we also know we need to be ready.

Hi-tech roads for an even higher-tech tomorrow

Our roads are some of the most sophisticated in the world, fitted out with millions of pieces of technology to ensure the road runs smoothly and safely (go here for more on road safety). CAVs will benefit from roads that can ‘talk’ to them, providing vital information about what’s happening around them and ahead, beyond the range of their own sensors.

As a first step to preparing our roads for a CAV-driven future, we’ve trialled various types of CAVs on our motorways, to investigate the technology and the issues and opportunities specific to our road infrastructure. This includes trials of partially automated vehicles already on the road today, highly automated vehicles, connected vehicle communications (platooning), remote operation of automated vehicles, automation of vehicles for specific road operations/maintenance tasks, and current developments to provide data from our roads so CAVs can safely handle dynamic scenarios on motorways such as incidents and roadworks.

We’ve also been talking to people about CAVs and getting a sense of community attitudes towards the arrival and use of CAVs. It’s been an interesting experience so far—take a look at what we’ve been learning below.

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Trials

Find out how CAVs
responded on our roads

Market research
Market research

What the Australian community
is saying about CAVs

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News

The latest CAV
trial developments

Going forward, we’re continuing to explore opportunities for commercial adoption of more highly automated
CAVs, along with innovations in technology and road operations to support their safe introduction.